How your plants heal YOUR nutritional deficiencies: The benefit of growing your own food.

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The most beautiful words I have ever heard was during an organic greenhouse course in Florida. The instructor shared his ‘key’ to growing perfect, nutritionally-dense produce. After insisting we always grow our own food (and I’m paraphrasing here), he turned to us and said: “The most beautiful thing about gardening and tending your own land is that the plants have an unseen, but unmistakeable intelligence. If you bond with them and use your bare hands to handle them, if you sweat into the earth that grows them and if you love them entirely; they will grow to be nutritional super-foods, perfectly designed for your particular body chemistry and ultimate homeostatic balance.” His words showed me the power of nature in healing humans. Mother Nature has nothing short of a genius. This genius present in the Earth, soil and natural bacteria of the land, is able to detect your DNA from the hair, the skin particles and the sweat that you pour into your gardening and will then perceive which nutrients you lack and will absorb more of these from the land so that the resulting foods can then mend all of your nutritional deficiencies. How absolutely, incredibly magical is that?! I am eternally awed…

We’ve all listened to our Mothers preaching about how we need to eat our fruits and veggies, but if you’re anything like I was as a child, you were finding ways to sneak around eating the plain steamed broccoli or dare I say it?-the dreaded brussel sprouts. I used to think I was quite slick, throwing my cooked veggies behind the fridge (and yes, my sisters and I had an unbeatable strategy, at least until my mother discovered the large mound of food rotting up the wall behind the fridge- sorry Mom). Little did I know, there would come a day when I not only went far and wide looking for more veggies to eat but that I would actually come to LOVE them- all of them and that my ultimate dream would be to own a large piece of organic non-tampered land, surrounded by rainforest and be able to sustain myself and my land indefinitely.

One of the greatest misfortunes of our modern way of eating is how disconnected we truly are to our food. We do not get to watch our produce grown under our care or feel the moist earth under our fingernails as we manipulate the land that nourishes our plants so perfectly. We do not get to smell the sweet aromas of our ripe fruit wafting up our nostrils as the breeze carries it our way, or feel the satisfaction of knowing that it was our energy, efforts and love that brought life to the very food that will then give life to us, through synergistic nourishment. This disconnect doesn’t only impair our ability to bond with nature and absorb energy from its foods completely, but it also doesn’t allow us to discern when a food is bad for us. For example, how many of us would continue to eat commercial meat is we were the ones to witness the immense pain, suffering, force-feeding, force-breeding and disease that the animals must endure prior and during slaughtering. Most of us are simply not aware of the highly disturbing agriculture and factory farming practices, others pretend to be ignorant in order to avoid change. The mistreatment of plants, through chemical usage, genetic manipulation and soil mono-cropping (basically raping the soil) is not much better and would strike most of us as highly disturbing.

This unfortunate disconnect robs us of our ability to reap the most benefits from, while inflicting the least harm- onto Nature. It is time for global change, not only to preserve and protect our environment’s delicate ecosystem, but the delicate ecosystem within each of us as well. What we do to the Earth we indirectly do to ourselves. It’s time to regain the respect we have lost in the pursuit of monetary and political gain. It’s time to listen to Nature, to listen to ourselves and to reconnect.

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